With little publicity until after the on-sale started, the London Organising Committee of the 2012 Olympic Games made some new tickets available and released further unsold tickets on Friday 11th May at two hour’s notice to those ticket purchasers initially disappointed in 2011 when tickets first went on sale.  This is apparently part of a strategy to reduce presssure on the ticket sales website by drip-feeding the release of additional tickets over the next fortnight, until a general release to the public of all remaining unsold tickets on 23 May.  There are also additional tickets for events to be added on 29 May.

Over a million people were “disappointed” in the original on-sale – some believing they had been successful then told there were no tickets for them – and they can now purchase up to 4 tickets for one session provided they apply before 17 May – and are successful.  According to Locog announcements, tranches of seats for specific events will be released each day, with unsold tickets being carried forward to be generally available on subsequent days.  Already there are reports of further disappointments, according to BBC News.

BBC sports news correspondent James Pearce said: “Presumably they had kept quiet for fear of demand being too great for a website which has sometimes struggled to cope.”  Once again media coverage is questionning the fairness of the sales method, with restricted access to particular groups of customers and not all events being on offer at the same time.

Lord Sebastian Coe, defending the LOCOG ticketing arrangements on BBC TV’s Sunday morning Andrew Marr show said: “75% of the 11 million tickets that were available are in the hands of the British public. That’s a commitment we made right at the beginning of this process, and at the end of this process we will deliver it.”

With little publicity until after the on-sale started, the London Organising Committee of the 2012 Olympic Games made some new tickets available and released further unsold tickets on Friday 11th May at two hour’s notice to those ticket purchasers initially disappointed in 2011 when tickets first went on sale.  This is apparently part of a strategy to reduce presssure on the ticket sales website by drip-feeding the release of additional tickets over the next fortnight, until a general release to the public of all remaining unsold tickets on 23 May.  There are also additional tickets for events to be added on 29 May.

Over a million people were “disappointed” in the original on-sale – some believing they had been successful then told there were no tickets for them – and they can now purchase up to 4 tickets for one session provided they apply before 17 May – and are successful.  According to Locog announcements, tranches of seats for specific events will be released each day, with unsold tickets being carried forward to be generally available on subsequent days.  Already there are reports of further disappointments, according to BBC News.

BBC sports news correspondent James Pearce said: “Presumably they had kept quiet for fear of demand being too great for a website which has sometimes struggled to cope.”  Once again media coverage is questionning the fairness of the sales method, with restricted access to particular groups of customers and not all events being on offer at the same time.

Defending the LOCOG ticketing arrangements, with varying degrees in the past of acknowledging the role of Ticketmaster, Lord Sebastian Coe told the Andrew Marr show: “Seventy five per cent of the 11 million tickets that were available are in the hands of the British public. That’s a commitment we made right at the beginning of this process, and at the end of this process we will deliver it.”  He acknowledges that there is a huge disapoointment factor for an event with such high demand but does not address the many questions about the fairness of the ballot process, and the website failures and time-outs which have dogged the on-sale process.

A session is planned for Europe Talks Tickets in Madrid 23-25 May 2012 to hear about the progress and process of London 2012 Olympics Ticketing.

BBC News coverage: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-18045550