All posts by RE

Amazon….Event Ticketing?

Today, Amazon launched its new Amazon Home Services product, with a huge banner placement and video on its homepage. Amazon Home Services allows people to enter their zip code, and search for service providers such as electricians, home theater installers, or just “odd jobs” around the house (all in direct competition with Yelp, and somewhat in competition with listing services such as Angie’s List). All quite uninteresting to the arts, until a deeper search of the offerings reveals arts-based services such as voice lessons, violin lessons, and guitar lessons. There are also options to “Hire A Singer,” as well as the strangely specific “Hire a Silk Aerialist.” While the former are educational experiences, the latter are clearly performances.

Once you pick the service, you are asked to select from vendors for, say, TV installation, based on price and star rating. I loaded that link into three different browsers, two logged into Amazon, and one not, and got prices for the same service as the first choice ranging from $145-$199. Amazon seems to be experimenting with dynamic pricing as it does on its books and other products, selling it via algorithm to optimize the price. (You can see this by using a service such as thetracktor.com to track Amazon prices as they fluctuate on products. For example, this toy plane).

 

Amazon Home Services

Amazon’s new Home Services

Amazon has already become involved with other arts-based services, such as its Amazon Artists Stores, and this strange page that mentions that concert tickets can be bought via Amazon’s partner, RazorGator (but the link doesn’t work). As of mid-2013, Amazon’s Internet Movie Database (IMDB) app also allows people to purchase tickets to movies through a partnership with Fandango. While these purchasing options are mostly via partners, Amazon sells just about everything else, and the launch of Amazon Home Services moves it one step closer to full-on event ticketing.

So, let’s explore what an Amazon-based ticketing service might look like. Users would be buying tickets from a system they know and trust. That’s a benefit for everybody.

–Amazon Prime members would likely be able to purchase tickets with no service fees, or have them physically mailed for no service fees.

–Amazon already sells deals and items locally via Amazon Local.

–Amazon would likely provide an app for service providers (cultural organizations) for access control into the venue.

–Amazon already has an incredible review system that would easily accommodate a theater or dance performance review.

–Amazon would likely provide a ticket-purchase API allowing tie-ins with popular CRM systems, as it has done for other services.

–Cultural organizations would benefit from Amazon’s built-in dynamic pricing algorithm, selling the ticket for the most it could get for it based on demand.

–Amazon would provide visibility and exposure to cultural events to Amazon customers — a valuable marketing benefit.

–Amazon would take a cut of the ticket sale, which seems to be around 15% for most items, which is less than what many secondary ticketing services currently charge.

Tickets are emotional purchases, and Amazon is an expert selling platform. Based on these points, I believe it is only a matter of time until Amazon disrupts ticketing by applying its selling system to cultural experiences. How would you feel about Amazon getting into the ticketing business and selling tickets for your cultural organization?

Update: Is Amazon About To Launch Event Ticketing?

Today, Amazon launched its new Amazon Home Services product, with a huge banner placement and video on its homepage. Amazon Home Services allows people to enter their zip code, and search for service providers such as electricians, home theater installers, or just “odd jobs” around the house (all in direct competition with Yelp, and somewhat in competition with listing services such as Angie’s List). All quite uninteresting to the arts, until a deeper search of the offerings reveals arts-based services such as voice lessons, violin lessons, and guitar lessons. There are also options to “Hire A Singer,” as well as the strangely specific “Hire a Silk Aerialist“. While the former are educational experiences, the latter are clearly performances.

Once you pick the service, you are asked to select from vendors for, say, TV installation, based on price and star rating. I loaded that link into three browsers, two logged into Amazon, and one not, and got prices for the same service as the first choice ranging from $145 to $199. Amazon seems to be experimenting with dynamic pricing as it does on its books and other products, selling it via algorithm to optimize the price. (You can see this by using a service such as thetracktor.com to track Amazon prices as they fluctuate on products. For example, this toy plane).

Amazon has already become involved with other arts-based services, such as its Amazon Artists Stores, and this strange page that mentions that concert tickets can be bought via Amazon’s partner, RazorGator (but the link doesn’t work). As of mid-2013, Amazon’s Internet Movie Database (IMDB) app also allows people to purchase tickets to movies through a partnership with Fandango. While these purchasing options are mostly via partners, Amazon sells just about everything else, and the launch of Amazon Home Services moves it one step closer to full-on event ticketing.

So, let’s explore what an Amazon-based ticketing service might look like.

  • Users would be buying tickets from a system they know and trust. That’s a benefit for everybody.
  • Amazon Prime members would likely be able to purchase tickets with no service fees, or have them physically mailed for no service fees.
  • Amazon already sells deals and items locally via Amazon Local.
  • Amazon would likely provide an app for service providers (cultural organizations) to check people into the venue.
  • Amazon already has an incredible review system that would easily accommodate a theater or dance performance review.
  • Cultural organizations would benefit from Amazon’s built-in dynamic-pricing algorithm, selling the ticket for the most it could get for it based on demand.
  • Amazon would provide visibility and exposure to cultural events to Amazon customers — a valuable marketing benefit.

Tickets are emotional purchases, and Amazon is an expert selling platform. Based on these points, I believe it is only a matter of time until Amazon disrupts ticketing by applying its selling system to cultural experiences. How would you feel about Amazon getting into the ticketing business and selling tickets for your cultural organization?

UPDATE — We have now confirmed that Amazon Local has begun selling tickets to West End shows. A sample of an Amazon Local ticket purchase page for “The Commitments” shows an interesting feature gathering preference data, asking the user to click either “like”, “neutral”, or “dislike” and then storing these data along with the user’s record on Amazon. Amazon claims that all West End shows are available on Amazon Local, and we have put the word out to see if we can get more information from show producers or an attendee to the service. Given the launch of Amazon Local arts ticketing in the U.K., a U.S. launch for Broadway seems inevitable.

Implementing new technology – the psychology

Ron Evans (@groupofminds) argues that choosing the new technology solutions is only half of what is needed to implement new technology.  Tackling the resistance to change and the lack of adoption is the real challenge.

From experience with organizations in the US, Ron sees many examples where the new solutions are not able to deliver the benefits they offer:

Your system is ready to help you be awesome, but you and your organization haven’t taken the time to examine and modify your daily behaviors to be awesome. Take a new ticketing system example, the ticketing company is interested in getting you on board using their system, making sure you have their initial training, and then setting you loose. Everything after that is an expense to them in support costs, so there is no real financial motivation for them. Your Director expects you to be up and running, and with all the other hats you’re wearing, you try to go with the flow. But you’re not taking advantage of all the brand-new efficiencies and marketing opportunities your new system has given you, and this is hurting you.

As humans, we are complex animals, but our behavior patterns often solidify quickly. Our brains are built to automate tasks so we don’t have to think about them. If you alter the pattern, it just feels weird. Studies have shown that organizations and individuals actively resist change for a variety of reasons.  A psychologist by the name of Kurt Lewincreated a Three-Step Model for understanding and helping organizational and individual change. 

Technology change can be daunting — it’s no wonder that arts organizations often resist it so much. But it needs to happen – and when a holistic view is taken to organizational technology change, success is much more likely.

As an arts marketing and technology guy, I get asked about tech a lot. I help people choose online ticketing systems, new website content management systems, email marketing software — if it is online technology, I’ve probably helped an arts group somewhere in the US to choose and implement it. When I first started consulting, I thought my job would be to help people make the right choices, and then be on my way. But I’ve found over the years that this is only half of what’s needed to implement new technology.

Say you’ve got a brand-new ticketing system. It can do all the things your old system could never do. You get it installed, and you get training from the company on how to use it. You’ve received a great start! But, where I see staff at organizations fall short is when they apply their old behaviors to the new system, and don’t create new behaviors. The motivations and follow-through on behavior modification aren’t there.

Consider this example: You were using Excel to store patron information and pulling your hair out. You get a grant to get a new CRM system where you can track all the details of your patrons via the web. You can even check it and update it from home if you want to. You get everything installed, you get training on how to use the system, and then you’re set out on your own to make the magic happen. Fast forward three months. You have a stack of email signup cards sitting next to your desk that are three months old — you haven’t got those names into the system yet. You have a fundraising event coming up, and you need to send out a notice to your donor list. You had assigned your intern to update the email addresses in the CRM, based on the bouncebacks from your email software; but he hasn’t done it yet, because he just finally applied for a login/password (and doesn’t like the new system anyway), and you don’t have time to do it yourself. These are examples of lack of adoption and resistance to change that I see all the time.

Your system is ready to help you be awesome, but you and your organization haven’t taken the time to examine and modify your daily behaviors to be awesome. Taking the new ticketing system example, the ticketing company is interested in getting you on board using their system, making sure you have their initial training, and then setting you loose. Everything after that is an expense to them in support costs, so there is no real financial motivation for them. Your Director expects you to be up and running, and with all the other hats you’re wearing, you try to go with the flow. But you’re not taking advantage of all the brand-new efficiencies and marketing opportunities your new system has given you, and this is hurting you.

As humans, we are complex animals, but our behavior patterns often solidify quickly. Our brains are built to automate tasks so we don’t have to think about them — you can see this yourself when you brush your teeth in the morning. Likely you always do it the same way, same hand, same number of brushes. If you alter the pattern, it just feels weird. Studies have shown that organizations and individuals actively resist change for a variety of reasons:

  • On the individual side, some sources of change resistance include economic resistance (people may fear that they won’t be able to work with the new system and may lose their job), fear of the unknown (people don’t want to do what they don’t understand), and just plain old habit.
  • On the organizational side, organizations are designed to be stable, and have mechanisms and procedures intact to encourage stability; this “structural inertia” is at odds with any sort of change.

So, there is a lot going against change.  A psychologist by the name of Kurt Lewin created a model for understanding and helping organizational and individual change. Lewin’s Three-Step Model says that organizations should follow these steps to be successful:

  1. Unfreezing — Getting people on board that the current status quo is not acceptable
  2. Movement — Identifying new behavior/systems that will be the new “normal,” communicating this, and adopting it as the new way of doing things
  3. Refreezing — Making the new system permanent, by creating incentives and rewards to solidify the new behavior.

In working with my clients, I’ve found that if organizational technology change is approached as a whole process as Lewin describes, the chance of successful implementation skyrockets. People are on board with the reasons for the change, they help to make the choices to implement the change, and they see the rewards of proper implementation.

Let’s go back to our organization with the new ticketing system. Choosing the new system solved part of the problem, but now you can see that the behavior change didn’t happen with this organization. If we could turn back the clock on this implementation, as the change agent I’d have all members who would be using the new system get together and explore why the old system is not working. I’d work with the group to document who needs access to the new system when, and to do what. What are the daily operations the system will be used for? What are the dependencies of each person on the system and on the other people in the group? How is information supposed to flow in and out of the ticketing system, who is supposed to do this, and what do they need to do it?

And for step 3, I’d assist the members in creating a 1) measurement system, so they can know when they are being successful and 2) an incentive/rewards system to encourage the behavior change to become permanent. People love a challenge, and this is the type of feeling you want to inspire with your staff when doing a major technology change.

Technology change can be daunting — it’s no wonder that arts organizations often resist it so much. But it needs to happen — we need to keep our technology systems up to date so we can be efficient and effective in helping our patrons to experience our art. When a holistic view is taken to organizational technology change, success is much more likely.

Ron Evans (follow on Twitter as @groupofminds) is an arts marketing and consumer psychology researcher, and principal consultant at Groupofminds.com Arts Marketing Consultants in Sunnyvale, CA, USA. He helps arts audiences increase their understanding, appreciation, and frequency of attendance through innovative uses of technology. This post was originally published on http://groupofminds.com

Half-price arts tickets: deep discounts or new opportunities

Half-price tickets are hot. From the TKTS booth in New York City, to your local arts service organization with a half-price ticket list, the idea of “half-price tickets” activates the brain in an exciting way. First, there is the idea of the huge discount — similar to what you might feel when you say a $200 awesome leather jacket marked down to $100. A steal, right? Then there is the idea that they are limited (and we recommend limiting them) — get them while they’re hot, as they won’t be around long. Two powerful incentives to buy those tickets right now!

Let’s pause for a moment and ask ourselves “what’s the purpose of selling a half-price ticket?”

In my last post, I spent some time talking about advance sales and discount ticketing strategies, as well as how it’s too easy to train the patron to wait for a better deal if you offer large discounts late in the game. I mentioned that “the right thing to do here is create a marketing strategy that offers the most discount to people who give up the most convenience.” It’s enticing and effective to trade one thing for another (in this case, giving up convenience to get a discount back). I think we’ll see this idea of “trading something for something else” pop up again later on.

I also began to talk about discount ticketing, and I’d like to talk a little about some of the group-based buying programs (the half-price ticket program being an old favorite, and new group-purchase sites such as Groupon.com and LivingSocial that have recently come on the scene).

Half-price arts tickets: deep discounts or exposure to new opportunities?

Half-price tickets are hot. From the TKTS booth in New York City, to your local arts service organization with a half-price ticket list, the idea of “half-price tickets” activates the brain in an exciting way. First, there is the idea of the huge discount — similar to what you might feel when you say a $200 awesome leather jacket marked down to $100. A steal, right? Then there is the idea that they are limited (and we recommend limiting them) — get them while they’re hot, as they won’t be around long. Two powerful incentives to buy those tickets right now!

Let’s pause for a moment and ask ourselves “what’s the purpose of selling a half-price ticket?” If opening night is tomorrow night, and you have no tickets sold, half-price ticketing the house is not a good solution, for all the reasons I mentioned in the last post. So what else can we do with it? With a thought-out strategy, I believe that:

  • Half-price tickets are good to move unsold inventory — as long as you limit the number of tickets to a small amount and/or control it in some way.
  • Half-price tickets are a good way to sell obstructed seats — look at Cirque du Soliel… they will often sell a discount ticket for seats that have the tent pole in the view of the patron. If you’re ok with that, they’ll hook you up. Great use of a discounted seat.
  • Half-price tickets theoretically allow people to see experiences they wouldn’t normally go to — for example, a 50%-discounted theatre ticket might push you over the edge to seeing a show that is outside your normal genre of arts events, and you might discover you like it.
  • Half-price tickets theoretically allow people to experience twice as many arts events than they could on their previous budget — if people are devoting twice the amount of time to the arts than they were before, that’s a good thing.

The first two are pretty clear. On the last two, I say “theoretically” because although I’ve heard patrons say they use half-price tickets for these things, I’ve never seen any hard data that proves that they behave in this way. If you’ve got a half-price ticket program running on a strong CRM, let me know and perhaps we can look at the data together and find out.

Additionally, when selling a half-price ticket, you MUST put some mechanism in place to record the patron’s contact info. This might come with selling the ticket (they buy an e-ticket for which you have an email address, for example) or you may need to get it in other ways. Remember that idea of “trading something for something else”? Here, you’re trading profit on the ticket for the ability to market to the patron later on another show.

Super-deep discounts: Groupon and LivingSocial for the arts

There is a lot of buzz about Groupon and Living Social. here in the U.S. (check online for their U.K. urls). If you’ve been out of the loop (hey, welcome back!) you may not know that these services use a powerful combination of time limit, offer limit, and a need to have a certain number of people agree to buy the deal before the deal switches “on” and folks can redeem the highly discounted offers for restaurants, spas, vacation packages, and often, arts events. So you have a natural wish to share these offers with your friends, so you can get the deal yourself. These services move a LOT of offers. Here’s a short video explaining how these services work:

If you do some searches on the web, you can find both positive and negative experiences of those who have placed ads with these services. Just do your homework. Ask others in the arts community who have used these services to tell you about their experience. These services offer a huge amount of exposure at no direct cost, but can often have a high indirect cost (what you’re losing on the sale when the customer redeems the coupon). The exact terms of the deal with these services is up to the two parties, but the rule seems to be you’ll offer something at 50% discount, and the service will take 50% of the sale, leaving you with 25% of original revenue. So, $20 ticket, sold for $10, the service gets $5, and you get $5. $5 instead of $20 is a pretty large drop, so what are you “trading” for here? In this case, it’s profit now for exposure + potential sales later, and there is nothing wrong with that, as long as you understand it going in. Just remember that if the patron is going to get a benefit (lower cost), they should give up some value for it (restricted days to attend? Obstructed seats? Back of the house only? Use your imagination). But doing these with no restrictions can cause real problems as you might imagine. If the service doesn’t allow you to cap the number of offers sold, then you’ll need to design your offering options so there is some way for you to control the fulfillment.

How can your arts event ticketing system help?

Your ticketing system can play a big part in discounting as well. I’m surprised that I don’t see more promotion-code use in online ticketing, where several unique promotion codes are used through different marketing channels so the arts org can track which campaigns are bringing in the most ROI. That’s easy to do… mention the use of one promotion code on Facebook, and use another promotional code on Twitter, or on radio, or on TV. It’s a great way to look at actual ROI on advertising and marketing spend, because it means you’ve actually sold a ticket.

I also really like that some ticketing systems are now allowing you to connect with social media in the middle of the transaction. As part of the checkout process, some systems allow you to share on Facebook and Twitter that you’re buying a ticket to a specific performance, and when the message goes in the newsfeed, it asks your friends if they’d like to buy a ticket to go with you to the same specific performance. I don’t have any data yet on how often this feature is used, but I am seeing it included in more ticketing systems, and I sure like the idea. I think it will be commonplace in all ticketing systems within the year, so if you’re looking at a new ticketing system, make sure it’s on their radar.

Bottom line, there is nothing wrong with changing the price of the ticket to gain other things (trade paying less for buying in advance, trade paying less for giving over your contact information, trade paying more for convenience of last-minute decision making, trade paying more for a premium experience, etc.). Just make sure you’re considering the tradeoff, and including that in your calculations. And above all, experiment, share your results, and learn from any failures, so that you can improve your results over time. For further case studies and discussion on these issues, I recommend you check out the smart work at http://www.thinkaboutpricing.com. They are collecting quite a fine library of articles and know-how on the subject.

If you’re looking for a new ticketing system in the U.S., I’m happy to talk to you and point you in the right direction. Are you reading this post on http://theticketinginstitute.com? Then you already know about the work of my friend Roger Tomlinson who is a whiz at ticketing software selection in the UK and Europe. Additionally, you may want to check out the 2011 Ticketing Software Satisfaction Survey Report from the good folks at Technology in the Arts to see what people are saying about their ticketing systems in the US. Good read.

Happy ticketing!

-Ron

Ron Evans is an arts marketing and consumer psychology researcher, and principal consultant at Groupofminds.com Arts Marketing Consultants in Sunnyvale, CA, USA. When he’s not guest blogging for us, he helps arts audiences increase their understanding, appreciation, and frequency of attendance through innovative uses of technology. This article was originally published on the Groupofminds.com Arts Marketing Blog.

Discount Ticketing – Friend or Foe?

I am  Ron Evans, a researcher in consumer psychology, and the principal consultant for Groupofminds.com in San Jose, California, USA.  I am committed to helping arts audiences increase their understanding, appreciation, and frequency of attendance, through technology. This is my first contribution to The Ticketing Institute, and I hope I will stimulate some lively thoughts about online ticketing, CRM, and the emergence of connected technologies like social media into the arts-attendance experience. 

I have some opinions on discount pricing strategies – a subject I know a lot of people are quite passionate about.

Pricing and marketing arts event tickets isn’t easy.  When faced with the need to “put butts in seats” it can be tempting to do whatever it takes.  I hope to give you some explanations on why some discounting strategies would be a better choice than others, and help you avoid some short-term successes that could lead to long-term problems.

Pricing and marketing arts event tickets isn’t easy.  When faced with the need to simply “put butts in seats” (a phrase anathema to The Ticketing Institute) it can be tempting to do whatever it takes.  In this article, I hope to give you some explanations on why some discounting strategies would be a better choice than others, and help you avoid some short-term successes that could lead to long-term problems.

Picture this. You’re a big supporter of a large cultural music venue, so when you receive an email from the institution that tickets have gone on sale for an upcoming concert, you buy your tickets online straight away. You get your confirmation that you paid the listed price, and since the concert isn’t until a month from now, you go about your business.

Three weeks later, you get an email from the same organization, offering two-for-one tickets for everyone who buys a ticket going forward. But only for people who haven’t bought yet.

Wait a minute.

You bought your tickets early, and now you can’t get the deal.  You call the organization, and they tell you this offer is only for people who haven’t bought tickets yet.  You’re angry, and understandably so.  You think to yourself, “I could really make a scene here and demand that I be given the same offer,” but you probably don’t act on that idea. Instead, you smolder about it and swear to yourself that you’ll never be caught in THAT situation again. Next time, you’ll wait until you get the offer before buying anything.  Sound familiar?  I see arts organizations do this all the time.  And I see the fall-out that conditions the patron’s mind right along with it.

The scenario I just led you through results in a changed patron, and not for the better. It trains patrons to wait until there is a special offer before they commit to buying a ticket. The next show, more patrons will wait, which means fewer tickets sold far in advance, and more perceived need for a “fire sale” of a huge discount near opening in order to sell the seats. It’s a vicious circle, and as a marketing manager, it’s something you should be keeping your eye on. And sadly, it generally creates really bad feelings in your early buyers. It’s the golden rule — as a patron, would you want this to happen to you?

A simple way to get around this? Don’t email offers to people who have already booked.  Either discount for people who buy early on (called “the airline model”) or make the discount available to everybody (even people who have already purchased the tickets — always a good idea).

The airline model of arts ticketing

People seem to generally understand that booking your airline ticket early (3 weeks or more before your fly date) results in getting the lowest fare. The highest fares come if you walk into the airport and say “I want to get on the next flight to JFK.” Not only are you fighting the fact that most of the seats may be already taken, but the airlines know that you’ve waited until the last minute to make your purchase, which is a convenience they think you should pay for via a higher ticket price. If you wait to buy your ticket, you pay more. Pretty simple. But consider the following YouTube commercial from Hotels.com, that actively promotes waiting:

Wow. Training consumers to wait is a really good strategy for hotels.com, as they base their business on last-minute shoppers. Not so good for the hotels if you think about it.

For centuries, many arts organizations have followed a similar model, they’ve just called it something different, and priced multiple tickets together: the subscription. In recent years, most arts organizations have seen a reduction in the number of subscriptions, because people seem less likely to want to commit to being in the theater at a specific time/date far in advance. They want the convenience of making the decision to go at the last minute, just like the guy who wants to fly to JFK TODAY. So why do so many arts groups allow patrons to get on-board today’s flight at a discount?

One reason is the idea that an empty seat is an empty seat, and if nothing has worked up until the day of the performance to fill that seat, do whatever you can to fill that seat. On the surface, it makes sense. But in the long run, I believe it just creates more empty seats.

The right thing to do here is create a marketing strategy that offers the most discount to people who give up the most convenience. Those that buy early get the benefit, and those that wait risk a higher price or a chance the show won’t have any seats left to sell. If you get to the performance date and you still have seats you’re tempted to discount, don’t. It’s better that your regular patrons do not have access to them at a discount at this point. Either let them go unfilled (and realize that you need to work on your early-sales strategy) or give them as comps to middle school kids, as special rewards to donors to bring a friend, or anything else you can think of to get a body in that seat. But don’t reward the people who choose to wait and buy late.

Discounted arts tickets: friend or foe?

I’ll be up front; I generally don’t like discount tickets, unless they are for students/seniors or used as an incentive to try out a new arts genre a patron has no experience with. You’ve worked hard to price your tickets at a level where they are perceived as being a passport to a quality experience — less expensive tickets, handled the wrong way, can really alter the perception of the quality of your event in the mind of the patron. Not to mention discounting the ticket means less money in your account at the end of the day.

Many of you may have heard of the ticket pricing strategy that Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus uses — I’ve heard statistics that up to 80% of their tickets are discounted down from some much-higher price, so that people feel that they are getting a really good deal. And I think that is an excellent strategy for the circus. Going to the circus isn’t a high-risk concept — you don’t need to prepare in advance and be knowledgeable about Irish playwrights or the history of the War of the Roses. You just go with your family and watch acrobats and elephants, and you’re entertained.

But most of your regular arts events are significantly different. The patron doesn’t know how it’s going to be, and they’re not sure if they want to spend $25 for a ticket if the show is at risk of not being good. At this point in the buying process, consumers “on the fence” are searching for any kind of assurance that their money will be well spent, and that they will have a good experience. They are looking for a quality indicator. And when you discount the price, you are likely lowering the perceived value of the experience.

Researches have investigated the relationship between price and quality and showed that “consumers use price to infer quality when it it the only available cue” and that “price is used as a quality cue to a greater degree when brands are unfamiliar.” (Lambert 1972). While you have to purchase most of these studies online to read them, I found a great PDF of some sample research online by DPS Verma and Soma Sen Gupta called “Does Higher Price Signal Better Quality.” Break out the coffee on these research reports — they take some concentration.

I much prefer the idea of adding value vs. reducing price. Especially value that doesn’t cost you anything. Perhaps there is a new restaurant that has recently opened near your venue? Odds are they would love the visibility of offering your patrons a discount to dinner before your show. Work something out with them, and you can offer that discount as an added value to people who purchase by a certain date, or purchase a number of tickets as a group, etc. All without reducing either the perceived value of the ticket, or the amount of money you get to take home at the end of the day. But make it available to everybody. The people who bought early should always get the best deal, and should never be left behind.

In the next post, some real-life examples, discussion of half-price ticketing strategies, and exploring how ticketing systems can help you to make some of these options a little easier.

This article was originally published on the Groupofminds.com Arts Marketing Blog.  More on pricing from http://thepricinginstitute.com/ with links to resources