All posts by andrew@tickettattle.com

How is Tessitura Getting Ready for GDPR?

GDPR // Ticketing System Readiness Series

How are leading systems responding to changes in EU Data Protection? In the latest in this series we take a look at Tessitura

System

Tessitura

 

Background

Tessitura Network has always had data protection features present in their software and they have worked with their European Licensees to build a more granular specification for the new privacy features to meet the GDPR requirements. These were released in the latest iteration of the software (Version 14).

 

Their view

As a non-profit organisation, Tessitura Network exists to serve its licensees. The development of specific privacy functions to enable the venues they work with to be GDPR compliant has been driven by close consultation with these licensees.

 

What we saw

During our session, we were shown the latest release of software configured for a demonstration environment. We saw the staff interfaces for viewing and manipulating constituent (customer) records and ticket orders. We did not see a live example of how this will look online as this is currently in development.

 

Great to see

Tessitura is one of two systems we have seen that delivers a smooth and logical data journey for collecting explicit consent for third party producers and promoters. More systems really do need to prioritise not only this compliance but delivering it this well. We saw this working in the orders and customer screen in Tessitura and it is similar to what we have seen with others in prompting for consent based on basket contents and previous permissions gained.

 

As you can see in the ticket orders screen above, Paddington has never been asked for these permissions and this has caused the permissions box to pop up automatically at the end of an order. If Paddington had placed something in his basket that required the staff member to ask permission on behalf of another organisation, such as a visiting, partner or funded organisation, those permissions would also automatically pop such as below. You can see that ‘Organisation B’ has been flagged for a permission because of what is in Paddington’s basket.

 

If a permission becomes out of date, this will also cause the box to pop up – prompting the sales person to update the customer’s permissions. There is a ‘Today’ button that can be clicked if the customer is happy to continue with the same permissions as they already have on file.

 

 What we didn’t see ……. but is coming

The ability to clearly see in the audit logs that permissions regarding contacts were changed, the before and after values, who changed them, in what channel, when etc. This is a much-needed piece of functionality as you will need to specifically document when, who and who gave explicit consent if your organisation chooses to use consent as a basis for on-going processing. Tessitura’s auditing already includes this information, it is the displaying of it that is in development for release shortly.

 

Transition Services and Issues

With an extensive consultancy offering, Tessitura have a range of services to help manipulate or update existing data sets. Although we did not see it in operation, we understand that the ‘Out of the Box’ web interface TNEW (Tessitura Network Express Web) will gain access to these privacy controls as we saw in the back office. Of course, those organisations that have developed their own web flows against Tessitura’s impressive API will need to work with their digital agencies (Apps too!) to ensure these features and functions are being fully utilised.

 

Issue to consider

In the set-up we saw the title of a consent strand and communication channel ie ‘Marketing – SMS’ / ‘Fundraising – email’ it was not possible for the full statement to appear in the ticket orders screen however this could easily be stored in a custom table or screen if desired. Tessitura Network staff pointed out that this would also normally form part of your staff training and monitoring. However, venues will need to consider how longer term they ensure that the questions being asked are being kept inline with permissions already gained, if they are using consent as the basis for on-going processing and communication.

 

Stand out feature

In addition to only being the second system to deliver great tools for data sharing, we particularly like how granular Tessitura can be at reconfirming consent. Their superb ‘TODAY’ button allows staff to simply reconfirm all existing permissions with a single click when a customer is in contact with the call centre or box office. It will be interesting to see how the web takes advantage of this feature.

 

Overall

Tessitura’s community based steering has led it to deliver some smart tools, with end users in mind, allowing them to deploy their own organisation’s GDPR interpretation or policies as they see fit, not as their software company sees.

 


This article gives information in relation to what we consider to be best practice. However, compliance is context and fact sensitive and as such following any guidance does not guarantee regulatory or statutory compliance.

The Information Commissioners Office will judge any complaint on its own merits, and organisations in need of context or situation specific legal advice should seek it from an appropriately qualified source.


This work has been made possible by support from Arts Council England

ACE_Logo


 

Creative United’s Prosper Events

Prosper is Creative United’s business support programme for the arts, museums and libraries.

 

Prosper has been designed to deliver impactful business support activities to improve resilience, commercial capacity and investment readiness.

 

The upcoming masterclasses, workshops and webinars have been developed by industry experts and take place across England. Webinars can be accessed from anywhere.

 

The events cover everything from business planning to diversifying income to understanding your USP. Take a look at the full programme.

Chiefs Select Secutix

 

EXETER CHIEFS APPOINT SECUTIX AS ITS NEW TICKETING PARTNER 

 

 

Club Has Partnered With The Cloud-Based Ticketing Platform To Support Their Digital Ambitions

 

London, Lausanne, Paris, Madrid – 12 October 2017: English rugby club and current Aviva Premiership Champions Exeter Chiefs  have appointed SecuTix as its official ticketing technology partner.

Following a competitive tender process, SecuTix, the global provider of a ticketing engagement platform for the sports, culture and entertainment industries, has begun work across the Chiefs’ two businesses: the rugby club itself and their stadium, Sandy Park.  Alongside being the home ground for the rugby club, Sandy Park is a successful conference and banqueting centre.

The Club will use the cloud-based SecuTix 360° software to:

  • Grow their online ticketing business
  • Increase the average basket value through both upselling and cross-selling
  • Offer an enhanced fan experience when purchasing tickets online with 3D seat mapping technology, thanks to SecuTix’s ability to integrate with PACIFA technology
  • Develop deeper relationships with their corporate audience through an improved hospitality customer journey
  • Gain a 360-degree understanding of their fans and be able to engage with them across digital and mobile touchpoints

 

Tony Rowe OBE, Chairman & CEO of Exeter Chiefs, said: “We wanted to partner with a modern technology ticketing company that could support our digital ambitions for both the Club and Sandy Park. The SecuTix team impressed us with their experience of ticketing and the rugby sector.  Together we will use data to better understand what the fans want, create a first-class experience for them and drive a commercial return for the Club.”

Frédéric Longatte, CEO of SecuTix commented: “We’re very much looking forward to working with such a top-flight team as the Chiefs.  We’re confident that our SecuTix 360° platform, which is delivered as ‘software as a service’ (SaaS), will benefit the Club across not just ticketing, but also CRM and digital marketing.  It’s exciting times with plans in place to extend Sandy Park to 20, 000 seats and SecuTix will support the Club throughout this period of expansion to help them realise their vision for the future.”

Exeter Chiefs sell over 200,000 tickets annually.  It is the second Premiership Club to partner with SecuTix, Saracens being the first back in 2016.

 

About SecuTix

SecuTix is a European technology provider of a Ticketing Engagement Platform that helps organisations boost ticket sales and enhance audiences’ experience before, during and after live events. Our product, SecuTix 360°, is a cloud-based platform that combines ticketing and marketing functionality, and is offered as a white label SaaS service. Used by the largest sport clubs and stadiums, live entertainment businesses, and leading museums and cities across Europe, SecuTix manages the yearly sales of 30 million tickets. Among our clients are Opéra National de Paris, UEFA, Centre Pompidou, Aspro Parks, Saracens RFC, Paléo Festival, Musée Picasso Paris and more. A daughter company of the ELCA Group, SecuTix has a local presence in Switzerland, France, Spain and the UK.

 

 

Why I Changed Ticketing Systems – A Consultant’s View

Many of you reading this will be responsible for hundreds of thousands, possibly millions of tickets per annum, perhaps realising ten of millions of pounds in revenue. You sell theatre shows, sports events and much much more.

 I wanted to share a story of changing ticketing systems on a MUCH smaller scale.

 We recently migrated ticketing platform, I say platform, should be more like plug in, for the Ticketing Professionals Conference registration.

“your website is broken” – sound familiar?

 Sounds easy doesn’t it? 400 places, two price codes, a few promotions and one general admission event.

 Embarrassing

It was embarrassing, that as a conference for Ticketing Professionals we had a system so prone to, how shall I put it, moments of……er……. oddness. I remember receiving an email from Liz Baird of Wales Millennium Centre in early 2016 struggling to book her place. When I looked into the issue, she had attempted on less than 5 or 6 times to register. No payment, just register.

 It’s embarrassing we can’t get ticketing right isn’t it?”

We sorted her registration and I emailed an apology and said “It’s embarrassing we can’t get ticketing right isn’t it?”

“Yes, a bit” she replied.

 We carried on for 2016 and ran the system through the 2017 conference booking process, but it became clear as we entered our busiest period, things would have to change, both for our own sanity, but also our image.

 

Support for $139 / Annum?

Away from the public facing issues we experienced, we also had some real back end issues. Really basic things, like wanting to clearly and efficiently show VAT (UK sales tax) in our pricing structure and to calculate and present it properly during the transaction.

 We were using a simple annual licence of a WordPress plug in, we are still using a plug in, just a different one, as part of that there are support strands, normally by forum. I don’t think, for the price you can expect much more now can you?

 I got constantly frustrated by what seem as apparent answers being vague or pushing the issue to another forum, product or issue. Something as basic and making sure a customer got a confirmation email became a long and drawn out affair.

 Whatever platform you use, for whatever genre, there are some things that it should just DO. Printing a ticket? Sales Summary Report? Client Record? ( the list goes on here )

 

Business being held back

So we had the public facing issues, the back end issues, which, to a certain extent we could manage, but we began to feel we were missing out on functions or rather business benefit from functions.

 What do you mean by that? Well here’s a perfect example – our old system supported promotion codes (for a extra fee) but they were for all price codes in one event.

 So when we want to do a special promotion for venue, but not for vendor registrations we could not do that. Again it sounds small, but it was holding us back, we either had to apply the promotion code to everything and try and plaster advertising that it was only valid on a certain ticket and check every booking or not run the promo. Either way it was holding us back.

 

Greener Grass?

Unlike a lot of you, there was no complex data migration or mass staff training, but there were still some key tasks to undertake.

One of the key ones was to integrate with our (yet constructed) website. We eventually chose a theme that was designed for conferences and optimised to work with our new platform. I guess many of you may have done the same – ‘what other orgs have you worked with / have you experience of integrating with XYZ Ticket system?’

The great advantage of this step to bring things together is that we can easily drop widgets throughout the site, something we often see in AudienceView sites, and one of my stand out favourite advantages of that system.

Easy to Add Widgets – A Great Feature

We have lost features though, some we did not realise that were really useful to us. We used to have a great API to Mailchimp to add new delegates to our mailing list and flag their attendance. This allowed for segmented mailing to target or exclude booked attendees, we have had to resort to a manual process.

 This highlights that any change will see advantages, but likely loss of a feature or business benefit

 

Worth It?

Heh, we still have some back end lifting to do with our new platform. The number one issue we wanted to resolve was a tighter web integration, better online customer experience and fewer “your website is broken calls” – sound familiar?

 As a venue operator I changed system four times, all with net positives, I did 60+ transformations as a vendor and around 25 as a consultant, so I can say I have experience of it!

 It was a great experience to go back to the coal face and experience the frustrations or users, agony of research and the pain of implementation. On the back end of the project, I can’t imagine using anything else, I am thoroughly happy. Now, back to the business of using it to sell tickets………. While your here, have you booked for #TPC2018 yet?

 Check out our engine and get your place here (shameless plug over)

 

 

Yesplan on Tour Event 21st November, London

Yesplan on Tour Event – London 21st November

Cloud based venue management system Yesplan are bringing their ‘Yesplan on Tour’ series to the UK on the 21st November.

The event will be at Flanders House, the Belgium Embassy in Cavendish Square, London and run from 1.30 until 430pm.

It will be a great chance to get to see the tools that Yesplan are providing to the UK and European cultural sectors. There will also be a chance to hear of the experiences of the growing number of UK venues already harnessing the power of the system.

Production Managers, Programmers and Venue / Operational Directors as well as front line operational staff will find the content particularly relevant.

The event is free to attend and places are limited. You can register here

For more information visit the website www.yesplan.co.uk

First Speakers and Sessions for #TPC2018

Ticket Professionals Conference TPC2018

 

With just over five months until the next Ticketing Professionals Conference (TPC2018), the first speakers and sessions have been announced.

The response to the call for papers was superb, with over 65 sessions being put before Education Panel of industry professionals.

It is clear from the sessions announced so far that the focus in 2018 will be on continued improvement of revenues and customer service / interaction.

I’m sure we can all agree that these should form a core of our focus.

With more sessions and speakers to be announced we look forward to the event surpassing attendance and great feedback from delegates at the 2016 and 2017 events.

The Early bird price is still available and you can pick your registration up for the two day event from only £199+VAT here

 

 

Eventim Partners with FC United

Eventim Forms Partnership with FC United of Manchester

LONDON 2 August 2017. Eventim UK are pleased to announce their partnership with FC United of Manchester, the community football club owned and run by its members. Eventim will now deal with all of the club’s ticketing provisions including season tickets for 2017/2018 and 3-year season tickets, all available now.

 

The partnership came about after Eventim attended one of the club’s matches, being impressed by the family feel of the club they approached FC United regarding their ticketing. As FC United of Manchester matches attract crowds of more than 2,500 (several times the league average) ticketing had become a problematic area for the club.

 

Adrian Seddon, Board Member of FC United of Manchester, explains:

 

“Ticketing was an area which placed a big strain on our staff and volunteers, especially when dealing with the season ticket and membership rush over the summer and although they coped admirably this partnership will be very beneficial to the club.”

 

Eventim has extensive experience ticketing sports events, as a ticketing partner for the Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games, and as the official ticketing partner for some of the biggest names in European football, such as; Borussia Dortmund and Ajax.

 

The offering includes season ticket and membership card fulfilment, access control, print at home tickets and a co-branded ticketing webshop.

 

FC United of Manchester season tickets for 2017/2018 or a 3-year season ticket are available to purchase now on Eventim’s website.

 

AudienceView Acquires TheaterMania and OvationTix

TORONTO, Ontario, Canada – July 11, 2017 – AudienceView, a world leader in e-commerce software for events and entertainment organizations, is pleased to announce the acquisition of TheaterMania, including the OvationTixTM Software as a Service product as well as the TheaterMania.com and WhatsOnStage media brands. As part of AudienceView’s continued investment in its market-leading position providing ticketing, CRM, and fundraising solutions, the acquisition of TheaterMania extends AudienceView’s market reach to more than 2,000 arts and culture, sports, live events and education organizations globally, from the largest entertainment groups in the world to single weekend festival events.

 

“AudienceView and TheaterMania have long shared a common vision and passion to help entertainment organizations build devoted communities and fulfill their missions,” said Gretchen Shugart, formerly CEO of TheaterMania and now President, Arts and Culture of AudienceView. “We are truly thrilled to be aligned with an organization that understands the industry that we serve and has aggressive plans to invest in our products and offerings to drive even more success for our clients.”

 

“The combination of AudienceView and TheaterMania now provides arts and cultural organizations with best-in-class capabilities to control their brand and business operations while tapping into the immense power that effective distribution channels bring,” said Mark Fowlie, CEO of AudienceView.  “This acquisition expands our portfolio to become the ideal destination for organizations of all sizes seeking the best technology, services, and partnerships to drive their businesses forward.”

 

In keeping with the company’s unwavering commitment to customer success, AudienceView is dedicating additional investment to be focused on providing superior client service and support. The first-class OvationTix service and support will continue without change and will benefit from additional support, resources and expertise from AudienceView.

 

Additionally, the company will be bolstering product investment in both the OvationTix and AudienceView platforms and will be building innovative solutions that will be shared across both offerings.  Further, AudienceView’s customers will benefit from the significant audience reach, event listings, and multimedia content provided by TheaterMania.com and WhatsOnStage.

 

“Whether a venue has an audience of 99 or over 100,000, AudienceView is now the most compelling choice for organizations that want to grow their communities through innovative technology, strategic distribution strategies, and a team of experts dedicated to creating and supporting customer success every single day,” adds Mark Fowlie.

 

AudienceView will serve its customers from its Toronto and London offices as well as the New York TheaterMania offices.

 

JEGI served as the exclusive financial advisor to TheaterMania.

 

To learn more about AudienceView’s acquisition of TheaterMania and OvationTix, please visit: http://bit.ly/tm-ot-acquisition.

 

Breaking Down Complaint Letters

Quite a lot of projects this year have been focused on service and expectations our customers have of our ticketing operations, either as people, products or digital services.
We all know things go wrong, people (our staff) have bad days or even customers being a little bit on the grumpy side. Whoever is at ‘fault’ for the issue, however ‘big’ the effect was on the activity, you can rest assured that all complaints, well pretty much all complaints have the same basis make up.
1. About them and why you should listen to them
All very simple to start off and I guess it’s good to give the recipient of your complaint some idea about who you are and that you are experienced and know how this stuff should work.
Typically a phrase such as “I have been coming to XYZ for over 20 years” or occasionally the non numeric version, “as a regular attender over recent year”
highlight persona or personal circumstance, not membership status or longevity of patronage as flag to follow up
I think these set the scene really well, as when reading complaints (or praise) we must appreciate the persona of the author, if a ‘regular’ attender cannot find their way to the bar or park – we must think about our new customers – as they will almost certainly have an issue.  We should not however use the about me to prioritise the email, it is from one person, albeit a group of people may have been in the booking, it is not from £5,610 of revenue, so when looking through the letter highlight persona or personal circumstance, not membership status or longevity of patronage as flag to follow up
2. The Actual Issue
It is very often the case that the ACTUAL issue can take up a few short sentences of a multi page customer service rant. In the ticketed environments we work in, most AI’s fall Into one of five pretty clear categories
  • The seats were crap / overpriced ( we are talking restricted view, leg room, general pricing, booking fees, someone was talking in the row behind, etc)
  • My buying experience was crap (people were rude to me or website did not work/ I couldn’t use it)
  • I did not get tickets, everyone else did, your system sucks (pretty simple really, but when is a system ‘fair’ if you miss out?)
  • I don’t agree with your published policies and conditions (or did not read them – often combined with #3 ‘as a hard working junior doctor etc)
  • I work in IT / Customer service (catch all phrase – basically telling you what you are doing wrong and why they know better)
Now there is some tongue-in-cheek in those five, but they ARE the issues, we need to focus on these more than anything. We only have these scant view lines to work out where (if anywhere ) we have let the customer down or ‘could have done better’
3. What Makes you so different ( AKA the ‘multipliers’)
Depending at the entry point to your complaint above, the customer will deploy varying degrees of ‘multiplier’ to their story or issue to swell its impact. Now before we start, we must understand that for many people a trip to the theatre IS a special occasion, may reading this may go to three shows a week / month / quarter, but many of our customers may go to one or just a few a year. Invariably these is around a special occasion, typically birthday or anniversary.
Of course for every celebration there are the darker multiples, ‘her husband died last year’ or ‘I had an ingrown toenail removed, so could not possibly stand’ (genuine multiplier)
Celebration or a darker anniversary or circumstance, we do need to park the multipliers to one side when evaluating a complaint. This may sound harsh, but if we weight the story and not the issue, we risk focusing on circumstance and not resolution.
I was in the closing arguments of a murder trial I was defending, I could hardly ask the judge for an adjournment to come and get tickets
There are then the multipliers that are based on work, some of these are my favourite. It tends to be used by ‘professionals’, more than management, skilled or unskilled workers, as if we should pay more attention to the complaint of a barrister to that of a barrista – I have seen complaints using phrases such as ‘I was in the closing arguments of a murder trial I was defending, I could hardly ask the judge for an adjournment to come and get tickets’. Let’s think about that. No, they could not have done that, but when that barrister was on her way to court, if she had not been able to get a de-caf mocha choca-cino as the barista at Cafe Nero WAS queueing up for tickets all hell would break lose.
We should pay attention to the personal story, if only to have empathy and to be able to understand why they we’re disappointed, it should not, like personal circumstance provoke more or less of a reaction to the underlying issue.
4. The Claim
I would like you to rectify the situation – eight simple words. They show I am rational and think you should be given a chance to apologise (number 1 thing you should do anyhow) along with refund, exchange, making tickets available that could not be obtained.
The customer does not have to leave it up to you to decide on the response in service or monies that you may give. A nicely put, ‘I request a full refund for the seats I was unable to use’ is perhaps a justified request.
5. The Threat
So, if you do not give me what I want, I am going to do ……… which is normally, a #1 + #3 reversal – so stop being a member / donor, head to your competitor or raise a complaint with trade / consumer body.
 The threat should be the least of your worries, really!
If it is something you or your staff have genuinely done wrong and let down a customer in either service or product, you will want to correct it, right? Of Course you will. The threat tends to be used when the complainant knows that they are fault, have no or little basis for their counter claim. This can be seen as a form or bullying, expoesinally when tied at junior or less experienced staff.
6. The Wrap Up
So, we’ve heard about them, the issue, why they are so different, what they want and what they’ll do / no do if you don’t react, what else could be added? Well, that’s the ‘Wrap Up’. It’s easy to read behind the lines here, with themes of you’re useless at your job and everyone hates you, along of course with the challenge of “I know you don’t care about your customers, so you probably won’t even reply” – this is also know as the ‘Shitty Wrap Up’
Wrap ups are just or should be just that. We know the customer is really saying ‘I feel really let down and hope you can see why, please alter your process and / or (not always) refund me something. If the customer has written this, take it on board. If it’s a SWU – ignore that part and make your own from the actual problem and the claim, here the problem and consider the solution.
Finally
Not ALL complaint letters follow this exact structure but a lot do, or at least a number of elements within them. We must remember that the product we supply is associated with many other emotions, celebrations and traditions, we are offering far more than a parcel from Amazon, so when things go wrong the perceived damage or sense of injustice grow.
Next time you are reading a complaint letter, take a highlighter, highlight the issue and answer that, referencing the about me sections, but ignoring the multipliers. The threat and wrap are almost worth redaction completely, they add noise to what are focus should be – just solving problems and making customers have a wonderful event.

10 Years of Ticketsolve!

There are systems that are relatively new, ones seem to pop-up every few months. Conversely there are suppliers (and systems) that seem to have been around since the age of computerised ticketing. I had always considered Ticketsolve to be one the newest on the block.

On a recent visit to Dublin, I caught up ordertramadol with Paul Fadden about all things ticketing, I must admit to being shocked that Ticketsolve has just turned ten! I remember back in the day when they hit the market with quite a splash. Anyhow, here’s a look back in their eyes on the journey so far, with some fun facts and figures too!

Ticketsolve_infographic

Some Impressive Facts and Figures from 10 Years of Ticketsolve

 

10 years ago the arts industry was in a sort of revival, with Tony Blair renewing the government’s commitment to the arts and culture sector (March 2007 speech). At this same time, in the post dot com bubble, the technology sector was ramping up – fast.

 

But even with that revival (or perhaps because of it), and the rapid rise of technology, there was a sense of frustration within the arts. Why were so many theatres, venues and festivals getting left behind? Technology was moving forward, but arts organisations were being left to deal with unwieldy software systems at best – or no system at all.

 

Into that gap, stepped Ticketsolve. The brainchild of Sean and Brian Hanly, Ticketsolve was one of the first companies to recognise that theatres, venues and festivals needed a reliable ticketing platform, that was also scalable and affordable. Being software guys, they understood quickly that cloud technology (software as a service or SaaS), was the way forward.

 

While today cloud software is everywhere, 10 years ago, that certainly wasn’t the case.

 

“Prior to the proliferation of online software solutions, businesses had to make a huge upfront investments to have locally hosted in-house ticketing solutions.” says, Sean Hanly, CEO of Ticketsolve. With a background in programming and software consultancy Sean had seen the problems with locally hosted solutions first hand.

 

“Maintenance costs were incredibly high, and staff could not carry out remote tasks, set up remote box office kiosks, etc. – it was a massive overhead (and headache). Software-as-a-Service addressed all of these issues – SaaS allows organisations to get professional software at a reasonable cost. There is no costly upfront investment, no additional hardware, and no downtime,” notes Sean.

 

SaaS was a huge advantage for Ticketsolve early on. Adding to that was their collaborative approach to building out the functionality of the software.

 

Paul Fadden, Managing Director, noted, “We have always been customer focused. Today, we continue to listen and work with customers on the direction of the platform. There is no guessing – we talk to customers constantly to understand what their needs are now – and what they need into the future.”

 

This close level of customer collaboration has meant Ticketsolve quickly grew into more than just a ticketing platform – customers now view it as the heart of their organisations.

Today, the Ticketsolve platform helps arts organisations, with CRM, marketing, . . . . . .

 

Ticketsolve Future

This year, Ticketsolve celebrates it’s 10 year anniversary. Today, Ticketsolve is one of the leaders in ticketing in the UK and Ireland, with over 240 customers.

“Our future focus, and close collaboration with customers has led to fantastic growth for the company,” says Paul, “51 customers have joined the Ticketsolve family in the last year alone. As we further develop the platform’s functionality, we anticipate strong and continued growth.”

So what does the future hold for Ticketsolve?

SaaS ticketing platforms now dominate, with 80% of inventory being booked online with up to 60% through smartphones and mobiles.

“We have an obligation to our customers to continually innovate, and strive to make their lives easier.” says, Sean. “To that end, we are focused on engineering a lot of automation tools and integrations into our platform, which we believe will fundamentally change ticketing – and ultimately make our customers busy work lives easier.”

The last 10 years have seen Ticketsolve emerge in the era of SaaS, bringing fresh thinking to arts organisation, to collaborating intimately with customers building a platform that gets beyond ticketing and the box office.

With new system developments, and new customers joining the ever growing community of arts organisations and festivals, Ticketsolve seems to be achieving what it set out to do – bring enterprise level ticketing to the arts community.